Romanticized Reality

By: Amara Tamborini

When most people (myself included) hear the word “Titanic”, their mind instantly goes to a dreamy young Leonardo DiCaprio, the timeless Kate Winslet and their unrequited love story told in the Academy Award winning film, Titanic. When I saw The Titanic Museum on the itinerary, I couldn’t wait to visit the birthplace of The Ship of Dreams. I fantasized about standing at the bow of the ship, arms wide open with Jack Dawson holding me tight, or having tea with Rose on the first class deck.

When I arrived at the museum, I was quickly reminded of the real story of the Titanic. I was intrigued by the personal accounts from survivors; how their journey changed their lives forever. As I stood in a dimly lit room listening to the audio recording of their tales, I once again imagines myself on the Titanic. This time, there was no romance, no Jack to hold my hand or first class comfort. Now there was the mourning, fear and chaos.

An excerpt from the exhibit reads: “The way that films have presented Titanic’s last hours has shaped how we think and feel about what may have happened on board”. After reading this, I was rattled by the thought of not truly knowing what happened the night the Titanic went down. The stories of the victims lie at the bottom of the Northern Atlantic Ocean along with the bones of the Unsinkable Ship. After one hundred and four years and no living survivors remaining, we have to trust that the tales of those who made it off of the ship alive are valid. As for the rest of the unknown events, we fill the void with Hollywood’s romanticized takes of such a devastating event. Visiting the Titanic Museum refocused my attention to the history and made me think deeper in to the way I interpret reality and how it is presented.

 

One thought on “Romanticized Reality

  1. I remember how my sister felt when she read I Night to Remember. She cried for days over the tragedy. I am sorry your Hollywood version had to collide with reality.

    Me

    Like

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